Anatomy Of Your Credit Score

November 23, 2013 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

A Credit Score is a number that ranks a consumer’s credit risk based on a statistical evaluation of information in the consumer’s credit file. In layman’s terms, it’s a number that represents the risk that you will default on a loan, using your prior payment history and other factors as a benchmark. Statistically speaking, the higher your credit score number the less likely the lender will experience delinquencies or a default on your account. Different industries use different credit score products. For instance mortgage lenders rely on FICO or the Fair Issac Credit Company score to determine your credit risk level for home loans. A car dealer and a credit card company may rely on different credit score products. Each mathematical algorithm used to calculate credit scores is unique and extremely complex, so the information below is a simple explanation of how a FICO credit score works.

A FICO score is based on five different weighted factors as presented in the pie chart below:

The most common question I hear about a borrower’s credit score, is how to quickly increase the borrower’s representative score, so that we can get the borrower approved for a home loan. Sometimes we can also quickly improve a score to get a client a better rate and fee combination. The basics for increasing your credit score are all related to the weighted factors in the chart above and have to do with:

  • Correcting any delinquent payment histories that are incorrect.
  • Paying off account balances.
  • Rearranging account balances.

We have tools available by which we can create a plan that actually allows us to try different credit scenario fixes and measure the resulting credit score improvements. This new tool has already saved many of our clients time, money and frustration and is not available through your standard mortgage conduits. If you are looking to purchase a home in the next six months I would highly recommend a free credit consultation to make sure you have the best possible chance of getting the lowest interest rates on your mortgage.

Finally, when dealing with credit score issues it’s best to get help from someone who understands how credit scores are figured.  Attempting to raise your credit score yourself could be counterproductive as simple mistakes made during the process can actually decrease your credit scores delaying or making your home loan more expensive.  Please call me if I can help you.

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About Andre Hemmersbach

Andre Hemmersbach has been working in the mortgage banking business for over 20 year helping people successfully finance their real estate holdings. He can be reached at (310) 540-1330 #137.

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