Category: ‘First Time Home Buyer’

Hot Up-and-Coming Real Estate Markets

March 21, 2017 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

A great way to find hot up and coming real estate markets is to see where people are moving and it’s as simple as supply and demand…remember Econ 101?

According to United Van Lines, which has been tracking moving statistics for 40 years, retirees left sand and sunny beaches for western mountains. See the “Annual National Movers Study” below.

US map of hot up and coming real estate markets

United Van Lines Movers Study

Moving In Real Estate Markets

The top inbound states of 2016 were:
1. South Dakota
2. Vermont
3. Oregon
4. Idaho
5. South Carolina
6. Washington
7. District of Columbia
8. North Carolina
9. Nevada
10. Arizona

 

South Dakota is the most popular moving destination of 2016 with nearly 68 percent of moves to and from the state being inbound, furthermore, the state has continued to climb the ranks, increasing inbound migration by 23 percent over the past five years. New to the 2016 top inbound list are South Dakota at No. 1 and Arizona at No. 10 with 68 and 57 percent inbound moves, respectively.

 

Moving Out Real Estate Markets

The top outbound states for 2016 were:
1. New Jersey
2. Illinois
3. New York
4. Connecticut
5. Kansas
6. Kentucky
7. West Virginia
8. Ohio
9. Utah
10. Pennsylvania

In addition to the Northeast, Illinois (63 percent) moved up one spot on the outbound list, to no. 2, ranking in the top five for the last eight years. New additions to the 2016 top outbound list include Kentucky (58 percent), Utah (56 percent) and Pennsylvania (56 percent).

Purchasing a rental property or a second home in a hot and up coming real estate markets is a good bet if you are looking for capital  appreciation. If you follow some basic real estate investment guidelines, do a little homework and work with professionals, it could pay off in a big way! Call me to discuss winning strategies for purchasing investment properties.

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Home Loans For The Self-Employed

April 9, 2016 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

1040-Tax-Form

Home Loans for the Self-Employed

Getting home loans for the self-employed borrower may be easier than you think. Tax season normally represents a time of financial pain, but for some self-employed individuals it could represent an opportunity!

Everyone knows that one of the factors a lender will review before approving a borrower for a home loan in their income. What most people do not know, is that there is flexibility in the documentation requirements for self-employed borrowers.

A little known policy loophole in some lender’s underwriting guidelines is the ability to only use a 12 month average of net income from self-employed borrowers. Not all lenders follow the policy and some loan officers just default to asking for the industry standard 2 years returns because they do not know any better. The problem with that is once the underwriter reviews 2 years tax returns, they cannot just “lose” the documentation per their agreements with their investors; they have to use the 2 year average. On the other hand if your loan officer is aware enough to review and catch it upfront, a self-employed borrower who had a terrible 2014 but a record breaking income year in 2015 could be off and running with an approval to purchase the home they deserve!

I know the above to be true as our office usually turns around one to two deals every month that have been declined elsewhere for this very reason.

Please call me to set up a free consultation to create a plan so that you can qualify for a home loan to purchase your house.

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Mortgage Insurance Still Tax Deductible

December 23, 2015 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Your new home

Home Ownership now more affordable

On December 18, 2015, the President signed legislation that renews the tax deductibility of mortgage insurance (MI) premiums for qualified borrowers through 2016.The deductibility is effective for purchase and refinance transactions closed after December 31, 2014. MI premiums paid or accrued after December 31, 2014 and through December 31, 2016 may qualify for tax deductibility on borrowers’ subsequent federal tax returns as follows:

  • Borrowers with adjusted gross incomes below $100,000 may deduct 100% of their MI premiums.
  • For borrowers with adjusted gross incomes from $100,000.01 to $110,000, deductions are phased out at 10% increments for each additional $1,000 of adjusted gross household income.

Please call me to discuss your specific scenario to see how to best structure your mortgage loan.

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Lenders Only Look At Four Things Before Approving Your Home Loan.

April 20, 2015 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Getting a home loan is not as tough as rumor has it! The mortgage approval process simply boils down to the four basic items explained in the following few paragraphs. First time home buyers and even repeat purchasers need not be bewildered by the formulas and methods used by lenders, you just need someone to hold your hand and an expert that knows the home loan rules!

Lenders are looking for what I call the four “C”s and once you understand the concept of these basic requirements everything else starts to make sense.

  • Cash – Lenders look for “skin-in-the-game” as a way to make sure that you have a financial incentive to continue to make the mortgage payment when things get tough. The larger your down payment or equity the less they have to worry about the borrower walking away from the home loan. Minimum down payment requirements range from as little as 0% to as much as 35%

    You will need a home loan to enjoy this light filled room

    Get a home loan and then sit back and enjoy

  • Capacity – Another way of saying income. The lender wants to make sure that the borrowers have sufficient stable income to handle the mortgage, property taxes, insurance and other debts. Key words in the previous statement are SUFFICIENT and STABLE. Lenders will use a combination of pay stubs, W-2 and other documents and compare those to the only reliable source available in our financial system to prove their legitimacy….the IRS and your tax returns. The minimum requirements for income vary widely by program; lender and other factors so make sure you are working with someone that understands the rules.
  • Credit – Simply put – how have you handled other financial promises of repayment in the past? Nowadays it is easy for a lender to figure this out with a copy of your credit report and a number called a credit score. A credit score is numerical representation of your credit risk. Over 700 is good below 620 not so good. By the way there are easy ways to increase your credit score. (Call me to discuss)
  • Collateral – The property you wish to purchase. Lenders are looking for collateral (their security) to be in good shape and free of any health and safety issues. Why not a complete “fixer upper” see the cash bullet above. The lender wishes to protect a borrower from any unforeseen repairs that the borrower cannot afford. Besides the last thing a lender wants to do is to have to fix up a property after having to foreclose on a home loan.

I have been helping people finance their real estate for over 25 years. Whether you are a seasoned real estate investor or first time home buyer my experience and knowledge will insure that your home loan goes smoothly! I would be happy to meet with you for a free consultation to discuss your plans to purchase a home.

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Home Affordability Via Loan Rates

April 9, 2015 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Interest rates are the key factor in home affordability, not the home sales price. Home buyers mistakenly think that high real estate prices are keeping them from affording a mortgage payment, however, the biggest variable in home buyers affording a home are mortgage interest rates. (See chart below)

Given an annual income of $70,000 between a husband and wife, at the industry standard of 38% debt-to-income (DTI) ratio a couple could afford a mortgage loan of $525,700 at a rate of 3%. For every 1% increase in mortgage rates the borrower’s affordability drops another 10%. If rates were to merely raise 3% a borrower could not afford more than a home loan of $369,700.

Chart

Rate Affordability Chart

 

Please call me for a free consultation to see what size home loan you qualify for.

 

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