Category: ‘Purchasing A Home’

Mortgage Insurance Still Tax Deductible

December 23, 2015 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Your new home

Home Ownership now more affordable

On December 18, 2015, the President signed legislation that renews the tax deductibility of mortgage insurance (MI) premiums for qualified borrowers through 2016.The deductibility is effective for purchase and refinance transactions closed after December 31, 2014. MI premiums paid or accrued after December 31, 2014 and through December 31, 2016 may qualify for tax deductibility on borrowers’ subsequent federal tax returns as follows:

  • Borrowers with adjusted gross incomes below $100,000 may deduct 100% of their MI premiums.
  • For borrowers with adjusted gross incomes from $100,000.01 to $110,000, deductions are phased out at 10% increments for each additional $1,000 of adjusted gross household income.

Please call me to discuss your specific scenario to see how to best structure your mortgage loan.

Move Up Buyers Get A Break

July 9, 2015 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Your next home

Home Sweet Home

Move up buyers got a big break from Fannie Mae (FNMA) this week as a change in their underwriting guidelines will make it easier for move-up buyers to qualify. During the mortgage meltdown FNMA had added additional requirements and hurdles for the move-up buyers as a way to mitigate the extra risk. In the case of a borrower looking to convert his current residence to a rental, a lender had to prove a minimum equity position of 30% in the borrower’s current residence to use any rent to offset a mortgage payment. Needless to say most borrowers do not qualify for two mortgages without the benefit of rental income and a 30% equity position in the market of 2008-2014 was just as unlikely.

As of July 8th the equity test for move up borrowers who wish to keep and rent their old residence will no longer apply. This will allow the borrowers to qualify using fair market rent on their current residence to help offset their current mortgage and make it easier and quicker to process and close the new purchase transaction.

Lenders Only Look At Four Things Before Approving Your Home Loan.

April 20, 2015 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Getting a home loan is not as tough as rumor has it! The mortgage approval process simply boils down to the four basic items explained in the following few paragraphs. First time home buyers and even repeat purchasers need not be bewildered by the formulas and methods used by lenders, you just need someone to hold your hand and an expert that knows the home loan rules!

Lenders are looking for what I call the four “C”s and once you understand the concept of these basic requirements everything else starts to make sense.

  • Cash – Lenders look for “skin-in-the-game” as a way to make sure that you have a financial incentive to continue to make the mortgage payment when things get tough. The larger your down payment or equity the less they have to worry about the borrower walking away from the home loan. Minimum down payment requirements range from as little as 0% to as much as 35%

    You will need a home loan to enjoy this light filled room

    Get a home loan and then sit back and enjoy

  • Capacity – Another way of saying income. The lender wants to make sure that the borrowers have sufficient stable income to handle the mortgage, property taxes, insurance and other debts. Key words in the previous statement are SUFFICIENT and STABLE. Lenders will use a combination of pay stubs, W-2 and other documents and compare those to the only reliable source available in our financial system to prove their legitimacy….the IRS and your tax returns. The minimum requirements for income vary widely by program; lender and other factors so make sure you are working with someone that understands the rules.
  • Credit – Simply put – how have you handled other financial promises of repayment in the past? Nowadays it is easy for a lender to figure this out with a copy of your credit report and a number called a credit score. A credit score is numerical representation of your credit risk. Over 700 is good below 620 not so good. By the way there are easy ways to increase your credit score. (Call me to discuss)
  • Collateral – The property you wish to purchase. Lenders are looking for collateral (their security) to be in good shape and free of any health and safety issues. Why not a complete “fixer upper” see the cash bullet above. The lender wishes to protect a borrower from any unforeseen repairs that the borrower cannot afford. Besides the last thing a lender wants to do is to have to fix up a property after having to foreclose on a home loan.

I have been helping people finance their real estate for over 25 years. Whether you are a seasoned real estate investor or first time home buyer my experience and knowledge will insure that your home loan goes smoothly! I would be happy to meet with you for a free consultation to discuss your plans to purchase a home.

Down payment sources

March 20, 2014 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

The biggest issue facing most borrowers in this market is still saving the down payment and closing costs! I thought I would list a number of resources that are helpful to would be purchasers that are a little short on cash.

  • If you work for a company that has a 401K plan, check with your administrator to find out if you can borrow against your vested balance. Many plans allow for a loan up to 50% of your vested balance or $50,000 for a purchase of a home. Best part about this loan is that most of the time the payments will not count against your qualification ratios.
  • Call your HR department or boss to see if your employer has a company program that will do an employer loan for the purchase of your home. This debt does count against you but I have helped borrowers whose employer had incredible rates of interest for such loans.

    Your Backyard

    Your Next BBQ

  • Cash in a Roth IRA for $10,000. Currently the tax rules allow you to pull up to $10,000 without penalties for the purchase of your first home. (you still need to pay regular income tax on the amount you pull and check with your CPA).
  • Sell stocks or better yet, borrow against stocks or securities you own.
  • Check with Non-profits or your church to see if they have any special down payment assistance programs.
  • Sell or refinance a boat, car or RV.
  • Get a gift from any family member or members (some programs allow for 100% gift funds).
  • Find a co-signer or partner with someone with cash and purchase the property together (you can do an equity share agreement that splits the property price appreciation at the time of sale).
  • If you are a veteran, you do not need a down payment as financing is available at 100% of the purchase price.
  • Look for a seller that will carry a second (usually will not work in a seller’s market)
  • If you have already saved around 3.5% of the sales price for a down payment there are programs available that allow the lender to pay all your closing costs.

Call me I would be happy to discuss your particular situation.

Real Estate Values in 2014

December 20, 2013 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Being in the Real Estate industry gives me access to various   tools, reports and statistics that most individuals cannot find. That being said you can find a chart or statistic to make a case for or against almost anything. The big question on many of my client’s mind is where Real Estate prices go from here. Our friends at John Burns Real Estate Consulting do a marvelous job of sifting through the numbers on a state by state and county by county level to come up with relevant, timely and meaningful predictions about matters in real estate.

I found the recent information prepared by JBREC to be extremely interesting as it charts the historical ratio between the median housing payments to income.   A shorter way of describing this chart is an affordability ratio. As home payments get more expensive via higher rates, median home prices or a drop in income it is reasonable to expect a reversal in demand. The historical mean of the average housing payment to income ratio is close to 32.5%. The current ratio through October 2013 is 28.4% based on a 4.1% 30 year fixed rate.

MedianHousingPayment_to_IncomeRatios

If this chart holds true we would need another 13% increase in the national sales price or mortgage rates to go to 6% before we hit the historical mean of 32.5% in affordability.

Please call me to discuss your plans in purchasing a home or Real Estate investment in 2014. Unless you are paying cash, getting all your ducks in a row early will save you time, money and headaches!