Category: ‘Refinance’

Good Economy is Bad For Mortgage Rates

January 30, 2018 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Higher Mortgage Rates In Our Future?

Higher mortgage rates? I thought the economy was doing well? It seems almost backwards but a good economy is bad for interest rates. As the economy picks up steam,

Mortgage money is going to cost more

Money

investors start to worry about inflation. How much will inflation diminish my investment returns? The answer is simple for them. They only buy investments that bring a higher return adjusted for a higher anticipated inflation. Mortgages with lower rates do not get purchased, so rates move up. Simple supply and demand. So while the good news is your retirement account is growing with every Dow increase, the bad news is that any credit you may have or acquire, like a car or home loan, will be at a higher rate.

What does that mean in dollars and cents?

A 0.25% rate rise on a $300,000 mortgage equates to a monthly payment increase of about $44.00 per month and while that may not seem like a lot, these little increases can add up. According to Samantha Sharf at Forbes, in an article for January 3, 2018, mortgage rates are anticipated to top out around 4.5% by the end of 2018.

Please call me for a free consultation. We can discuss if you are in the correct mortgage product or need help restructuring high credit card or soon to be higher Equity Line of Credit debt.

5 ways to lose money on a refinance

March 8, 2017 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Refinance to save money

Refinance to save money

Your home is likely your largest single investment. When refinancing your mortgage, treat it like you would any investment by analyzing how the financial costs and returns meet your goals. This requires a clear picture of the financial goals of this investment. (See a copy my refinance analysis) Do you have a constraint on the monthly housing budget? Are you seeking the lowest overall cost of ownership? How long will you be in the loan? Without answering these and other questions, you can naively lose money on your home refinance.

Here are some of the common traps:

Fall for the monthly savings seduction: Many mortgage brokers or loan officers will push a loan that lowers the monthly mortgage payment. A lower payment might be your goal, but it could come with an overall increased cost. Your total refinance cost will be based on your outstanding loan amount, interest rate, loan term, and cost of executing the loan. Extending the term of the loan will have a dramatic effect on the monthly payment. However, borrowing any amount for a longer term will increase your total interest payments (all else being equal). You can even achieve a lower monthly payment with a longer term and a higher interest rate. Don’t be seduced by a lower monthly payment if it is not required by your financial goals.

Accept the “no cost loan” lie: Loan officers may also promote a “no cost loan”. Be assured that there is no free lunch.  A refinance takes effort and someone needs to get paid for the work. That cost is always hidden in a higher interest rates on a “No Cost Loan”. Each loan institution has different rates, different costs and different ways of recognizing those costs. It is actually possible to pay some loan costs, receive a lower rate, and achieve a lower overall cost of the loan.

Don’t look at the total cost of the loan: Your mortgage refinance is an investment decision. You should compare the before and after financial results before making this important decision. A new loan will mean new fees (title, doc fees, inspection, etc.) and a new cost of execution. It will also “reset the clock” on the loan. Fixed payment loans are constructed such that the initial payments are mostly interest and the final payments are mostly principal. The effective interest rate of your existing loan could be well below what you receive from a new loan. Refinancing may not make economic sense. You can only make the determination by comparing the total future costs of the existing loan to the total costs of the new loan. Your loan officer should be able to show you the total cost of both investments before you make the decision, not as you sign the papers.

Ignore the length of time you will have the loan: You may make a loan for 10, 20 or even 30 years knowing full well that you will only be in the house for fewer years. Your investment decision should be based on your financial goals and the total cost during the true expected duration of the loan. Your loan officer should be able to show you a comparison of the total cost of the loan only for the expected duration. Different terms lengths will affect both the interest paid and the accumulation of principal. These factors could be more or less advantageous depending on your financial goals.

Forget to examine ALL the options: A bank is limited to its own offerings. A mortgage broker can match your financial goals and your credit worthiness to multiple offerings from scores of banks and other institutions. A number-crunching mortgage broker can help you calculate the returns of these offerings. (See HERE for an example of this analysis.)  An experienced mortgage broker can offer even more options to meet your need.  If the monthly budget is not a factor, perhaps it makes sense to increase the monthly payment. This could include making extra payments on the existing loan. A financially astute mortgage broker can interpret the analysis of each of these scenarios for “regular people” and help show which option best meets the individual’s financial goals.

I am an experienced, number-crunching, financially astute mortgage broker. Contact me at 310 713-3100 for a free consultation and to find out if a refinance scenario is right for you.

 

 

Mortgage Insurance Still Tax Deductible

December 23, 2015 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Your new home

Home Ownership now more affordable

On December 18, 2015, the President signed legislation that renews the tax deductibility of mortgage insurance (MI) premiums for qualified borrowers through 2016.The deductibility is effective for purchase and refinance transactions closed after December 31, 2014. MI premiums paid or accrued after December 31, 2014 and through December 31, 2016 may qualify for tax deductibility on borrowers’ subsequent federal tax returns as follows:

  • Borrowers with adjusted gross incomes below $100,000 may deduct 100% of their MI premiums.
  • For borrowers with adjusted gross incomes from $100,000.01 to $110,000, deductions are phased out at 10% increments for each additional $1,000 of adjusted gross household income.

Please call me to discuss your specific scenario to see how to best structure your mortgage loan.

Historical Low Rates Are Still Available

October 31, 2013 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Even with the rate increases from May, mortgage rates are at incredible levels of which prospective borrowers should take advantage. Twenty years from now people will be talking about how they should have bought back in 2013 and financed using 4.0% interest rates, just like they talk about how they should have bought that piece of property back in 1990!

Click link at the bottom if you wish to review on a larger format.

Little Known Mortgage Underwriting Guideline Exception

August 1, 2013 Posted by Andre Hemmersbach

Over the last several years the news about lending and lending guidelines has for the most part been pretty negative so when there is something positive to highlight it makes my job a bit easier.

One of Fannie Mae’s (FNMA, the government institution that buys almost all the fixed rate mortgages made today) little known rules that could help certain individuals is how they look at borrowers who are purchasing, refinancing or doing a cash-out refinance for and elderly parent or disabled child.

If the elderly parent, or in the case of a disabled adult child, is unable to work or does not have sufficient income to qualify for a mortgage on his or her own FNMA will allow the borrower of the elderly parent or disabled child to purchase or refinance the home as the owner occupant at the owner occupant rates, loan to values and guidlelines even if they are not going to occupy the property.

There would be several additional documentation requirements but as a whole it pretty simple. More astonishing than the fact that FNMA allows this as an exception is that not all lenders follow the rule or even know about it.

If i can be a resource to you on any real estate matters please call me.